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Case Studies in Verifying Spacecraft Autonomy

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dc.contributor.author Prokop, Lorraine E.
dc.contributor.author Dorney, Daniel J.
dc.contributor.author Feather, Martin S.
dc.contributor.author Johnson, Stephen B.
dc.date.accessioned 2022-01-12T22:44:28Z
dc.date.available 2022-01-12T22:44:28Z
dc.date.issued 2021-03-06
dc.identifier.citation 2021 IEEE Aerospace Conference, Big Sky, Montana, March 6-13, 2021
dc.identifier.clearanceno CL#20-6476
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/53305
dc.description.abstract Spacecraft, operating with a time-to-effect faster than human command response, or with absent or delayed communication, have depended on autonomy. It is likely that this reliance will continue, and increase further in future missions. Spacecraft autonomy is used when operator intervention is not available or feasible, or when dynamic aspects of a spacecraft situation cannot be predicted in advance. This paper provides case studies of several successfully verified autonomous software systems across multiple spacecraft, flight phases (launch, transit, entry and landing, science utilization), and software classifications, and can serve as examples to future missions in methods of successfully assuring spacecraft autonomy.
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2021
dc.title Case Studies in Verifying Spacecraft Autonomy
dc.type Preprint


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