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Calculation of operations efficiency factors for Mars surface missions

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dc.contributor.author Laubach, Sharon
dc.date.accessioned 2016-06-06T19:07:48Z
dc.date.available 2016-06-06T19:07:48Z
dc.date.issued 2014-05-05
dc.identifier.citation SpaceOps 2014 13th International Conference on Space Operations, Pasadena, California, May 5-9, 2014 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 14-1343
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/45545
dc.description.abstract The duration of a mission—and subsequently, the minimum spacecraft lifetime—is a key component in designing the capabilities of a spacecraft during mission formulation. However, determining the duration is not simply a function of how long it will take the spacecraft to execute the activities needed to achieve mission objectives. Instead, the effects of the interaction between the spacecraft and ground operators must also be taken into account. This paper describes a method, using “operations efficiency factors”, to account for these effects for Mars surface missions. Typically, this level of analysis has not been performed until much later in the mission development cycle, and has not been able to influence mission or spacecraft design. Further, the notion of moving to sustainable operations during Prime Mission—and the effect that change would have on operations productivity and mission objective choices—has not been encountered until the most recent rover missions (MSL, the (now-cancelled) joint NASA-ESA 2018 Mars rover, and the proposed rover for Mars 2020). Since MSL had a single control center and sun-synchronous relay assets (like MER), estimates of productivity derived from MER prime and extended missions were used. However, Mars 2018’s anticipated complexity (there would have been control centers in California and Italy, and a non-sun-synchronous relay asset) required the development of an explicit model of operations efficiency that could handle these complexities. In the case of the proposed Mars 2018 mission, the model was employed to assess the mission return of competing operations concepts, and as an input to component lifetime requirements. In this paper we provide examples of how to calculate the operations efficiency factor for a given operational configuration, and how to apply the factors to surface mission scenarios. This model can be applied to future missions to enable early effective trades between operations design, science mission planning, and spacecraft design. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2014 en_US
dc.title Calculation of operations efficiency factors for Mars surface missions en_US
dc.type Preprint en_US


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