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Earth return navigation analysis for manned spacecraft using optical and radiometric measurements

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dc.contributor.author Abrahamson, Matthew J.
dc.contributor.author Ely, Todd A.
dc.date.accessioned 2015-03-27T21:08:46Z
dc.date.available 2015-03-27T21:08:46Z
dc.date.issued 2010-04-20
dc.identifier.citation AIAA Infotech@Aerospace 2010, Atlanta, Georgia, April 20-22, 2010 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 10-1319
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/45086
dc.description.abstract Future manned space missions will travel beyond low Earth orbit with more stringent navigation requirements and fewer navigation resources than used for the Apollo Program of the 1960s. A study has been performed to assess radiometric and optical tracking capabilities necessary to meet nominal and contingency Earth entry flight path angle requirements. Results indicate that 3 tracking stations will be insufficient for meeting nominal entry requirements, while the performance of a 6 station architecture is dependent on the entry geometry. Optical tracking results indicate that a narrow-angle camera is required for satisfying contingency Earth return requirements. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2010 en_US
dc.subject GN&C en_US
dc.subject Orion en_US
dc.subject Constellation en_US
dc.title Earth return navigation analysis for manned spacecraft using optical and radiometric measurements en_US
dc.type Preprint en_US


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