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Martian atmospheric modeling of scale factors for MarsGRAM 2005 and the MAVEN project

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dc.contributor.advisor Halsell, Allen en_US
dc.contributor.author McCullough, Chris
dc.date.accessioned 2013-08-19T20:44:44Z
dc.date.available 2013-08-19T20:44:44Z
dc.date.issued 2011-08
dc.identifier.citation Summer Space Grant and Summer Internship Program (SIP), Pasadena, California, August 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 11-4716
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/43537
dc.description.abstract For spacecraft missions to Mars, especially the navigation of Martian orbiters and landers, an extensive knowledge of the Martian atmosphere is extremely important. The generally-accepted NASA standard for modeling (MarsGRAM), which was developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. MarsGRAM is useful for task such as aerobraking, performance analysis and operations planning for aerobraking, entry descent and landing, and aerocapture [2]. Unfortunately, the densities for the Martian atmosphere in MarsGRAM are based on table look-up and not on an analytical algorithm. Also, these values can vary drastically from the densities actually experienced by the spacecraft. This does not have much of an impact on simple integrations but drastically affects its usefulness in other applications, especially those in navigation. For example, the navigation team for the Mars Atmosphere Volatile Environment (MAVEN) Project uses MarsGRAM to target the desired atmospheric density for the orbiter's pariapse passage, its closet approach to the planet. After the satellite's passage through pariapsis the computed density is compared to the MarsGRAM model and a scale factor is assigned to the model to account for the difference [3]. Therefore, large variations in the atmosphere from the model can cause unexpected deviations from the spacecraft's planned trajectory. In order to account for this, an analytic stochastic model of the scale factor's behavior is desired. The development of this model will allow for the MAVEN navigation team to determine the probability of various Martian atmospheric variations and their effects on the spacecraft. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2011. en_US
dc.subject Martian atmosphere en_US
dc.subject scale factor en_US
dc.subject dataset modeling en_US
dc.title Martian atmospheric modeling of scale factors for MarsGRAM 2005 and the MAVEN project en_US
dc.type Student Report en_US
dc.subject.NASATaxonomy Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration en_US


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