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Fading of Jupiter’s South Equatorial Belt

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dc.contributor.author Sola, Michael A.
dc.contributor.author Orton, Glenn
dc.contributor.author Baines, Kevin
dc.contributor.author Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma
dc.date.accessioned 2012-09-27T17:57:58Z
dc.date.available 2012-09-27T17:57:58Z
dc.date.issued 2011-08
dc.identifier.citation NASA Undergraduate Student Research Program (USRP), Pasadena, California, August 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 11-3573
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/42296
dc.description.abstract One of Jupiter's most dominant features, the South Equatorial Belt, has historically gone through a “fading” cycle. The usual dark, brownish clouds turn white, and after a period of time, the region returns to its normal color. Understanding this phenomenon, the latest occurring in 2010, will increase our knowledge of planetary atmospheres. Using the near infrared camera, NSFCAM2, at NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Hawaii, images were taken of Jupiter accompanied by data describing the circumstances of each observation. These images are then processed and reduced through an IDL program. By scanning the central meridian of the planet, graphs were produced plotting the average values across the central meridian, which are used to find variations in the region of interest. Calculations using Albert4, a FORTRAN program that calculates the upwelling reflected sunlight from a designated cloud model, can be used to determine the effects of a model atmosphere due to various absorption, scattering, and emission processes. Spectra that were produced show ammonia bands in the South Equatorial Belt. So far, we can deduce from this information that an upwelling of ammonia particles caused a cloud layer to cover up the region. Further investigations using Albert4 and other models will help us to constrain better the chemical make up of the cloud and its location in the atmosphere. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2011. en_US
dc.subject near-infrared en_US
dc.subject Jupiter en_US
dc.title Fading of Jupiter’s South Equatorial Belt en_US
dc.type Student Report en_US
dc.subject.NASATaxonomy Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration en_US


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