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Thermal cycling for development of hybrid fuel for a notional Mars Ascent Vehicle

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dc.contributor.author Farias, Edgardo
dc.contributor.author Redmond, Matthew
dc.contributor.author Karp, Ashley
dc.contributor.author Shotwell, Robert
dc.contributor.author Mechentel, Flora
dc.contributor.author Story, George
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-22T17:53:24Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-22T17:53:24Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-25
dc.identifier.citation 52nd AIAA Joint Propulsion Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah, July 25-27, 2016 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 16-2770
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/46147
dc.description.abstract A Mars Ascent Vehicle (MAV) would be a critical part of a potential Mars sample return campaign. As currently envisioned, the MAV would launch samples from Mars into Mars orbit. Challenging requirements would be placed on a MAV as it would need to be able to survive in the harsh Martian environment which can get as cold as -120°C in the winter. At these cold temperatures, survival heating could be necessary to keep the MAV within the allowable flight temperature range. Estimates for survival heating power show that a fuel capable of operating at low temperature would significantly reduce the total required energy of the MAV. This has led to consideration of a hybrid propulsion system due to its anticipated low temperature capability. A new wax-based fuel, SP7, has been developed for a notional MAV mission. Thermal modeling of the fuel in the Mars environment was completed in order to estimate the temperature response of the fuel during Mars diurnal temperature cycling. Preliminary thermal testing was conducted to determine the max temperature range, radial gradient, and ramp rate the fuel could tolerate without cracking. The modeling and preliminary testing was used to develop a comprehensive, 100-day thermal cycling campaign. A total of 200 cycles are planned that are representative of 200 Martian diurnal cycles, roughly one-third of a Martian year. After 150 cycles, the fuel samples show no signs of cracking that would jeopardize the rocket’s performance. Though not yet complete, this testing is showing that SP7 has the potential to successfully be used on a MAV mission. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2016 en_US
dc.title Thermal cycling for development of hybrid fuel for a notional Mars Ascent Vehicle en_US
dc.type Preprint en_US


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