JPL Technical Report Server

In-flight operation of the Dawn ion propulsion system through the low altitude mapping orbit at Ceres

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Garner, Charles E.
dc.contributor.author Rayman, Marc D.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-21T22:31:13Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-21T22:31:13Z
dc.date.issued 2016-07-25
dc.identifier.citation 52nd AIAA Joint Propulsion Conference, Salt Lake City, Utah, July 25-27, 2016 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 16-2620
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/46135
dc.description.abstract The Dawn mission, part of NASA’s Discovery Program, has as its goal the scientific exploration of the two most massive main-belt objects, Vesta and Ceres. The Dawn spacecraft was launched from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on September 27, 2007 on a Delta-II 7925H- 9.5 (Delta-II Heavy) rocket that placed the 1218-kg spacecraft onto an Earth-escape trajectory. On-board the spacecraft is an ion propulsion system (IPS) developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the heliocentric transfer to Vesta, orbit capture at Vesta, transfer between Vesta science orbits, departure and escape from Vesta, heliocentric transfer to Ceres, orbit capture at Ceres, transfer between Ceres science orbits, and orbit maintenance maneuvers. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2016 en_US
dc.title In-flight operation of the Dawn ion propulsion system through the low altitude mapping orbit at Ceres en_US
dc.type Preprint en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account