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Cassini maneuver experience through the last icy satellite targeted flybys of the mission

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dc.contributor.author Hernandez, Sonia
dc.contributor.author Wagner, Sean V.
dc.contributor.author Vaquero, Mar
dc.contributor.author Hahn, Yungsun
dc.contributor.author Valerino, Powtawche N.
dc.contributor.author Laipert, Frank E.
dc.contributor.author Wong, Mau C.
dc.contributor.author Stumpf, Pau W.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-05-08T16:02:36Z
dc.date.available 2019-05-08T16:02:36Z
dc.date.issued 2016-02-14
dc.identifier.citation 26th AAS/AIAA Space Flight Mechanics Meeting, Napa, California, February 14-18, 2016 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 16-0430
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/46041
dc.description.abstract The Cassini spacecraft will reach its spectacular end-of-mission in September 2017, after having spent a successful twenty years in space gathering invaluable scientific data about Saturn, its rings, and moons. Cassini has flown the most complex gravity-assist trajectory ever designed, which requires frequent maneuvering to achieve the desired targets. After so many years in operation the propellant is starting to dwindle, making it of paramount importance that the maneuvers be designed to prioritize preserving propellant. This paper highlights the strategies for 50 planned maneuvers during twelve Titan flybys and the last Dione and Enceladus flybys of the mission. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2016 en_US
dc.title Cassini maneuver experience through the last icy satellite targeted flybys of the mission en_US
dc.type Presentation en_US


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