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Deep Impact extended mission challenges for the validation and verification test program

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dc.contributor.author Montanez, Leticia
dc.contributor.author Holshouser, David
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-14T17:54:34Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-14T17:54:34Z
dc.date.issued 2008-05-12
dc.identifier.citation SpaceOps 2008, Heidelberg, Germany, May 12-16, 2008 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 08-1003
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/45359
dc.description.abstract The Deep Impact Spacecraft was launched on January 12, 2005 as part of NASA’s Discovery Program as a radical mission to excavate the interior of a comet. The Spacecraft consisted of two separate entities known as the Flyby and the Impactor, which were commanded to separate prior to comet rendezvous with comet 9P/Tempel 1. The overall mission was deemed a success on July 4, 2005, as the 370-kg Impactor collided with the comet at 10.2 km/s. This event was captured using the camera and infrared spectrometer on the Flyby spacecraft, along with ground-based observatories. Since this event, the Flyby spacecraft has been in hibernation mode and has received only a small amount of maintenance. The Deep Impact Program was managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), led by Dr. Michael A’Hearn from the University of Maryland in College Park, and built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colorado. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2008 en_US
dc.subject EPOXI en_US
dc.subject Test Bench en_US
dc.title Deep Impact extended mission challenges for the validation and verification test program en_US
dc.type Preprint en_US


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