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Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) network simulation tool development and its use cases

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dc.contributor.author Jennings, Esther
dc.contributor.author Borgen, Richard
dc.contributor.author Nguyen, Sam
dc.contributor.author Segui, John
dc.contributor.author Stoenescu, Tudor
dc.contributor.author Wang, Shin-Ywan
dc.contributor.author Woo, Simon
dc.contributor.author Barritt, Brian
dc.contributor.author Chevalier, Christine
dc.contributor.author Eddy, Wesley
dc.date.accessioned 2015-06-09T17:46:03Z
dc.date.available 2015-06-09T17:46:03Z
dc.date.issued 2009-08-11
dc.identifier.citation AIAA Modeling and Simulation Technologies Conference, Chicago, Illinois, August 11-14, 2009 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 09-2749
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/45288
dc.description.abstract In this work, we focus on the development of a simulation tool to assist in analysis of current and future (proposed) network architectures for NASA. Specifically, the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Network is being architected as an integrated set of new assets and a federation of upgraded legacy systems. The SCaN architecture for the initial missions for returning humans to the moon and beyond will include the Space Network (SN) and the Near-Earth Network (NEN). In addition to SCaN, the initial mission scenario involves a Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the International Space Station (ISS) and NASA Integrated Services Network (NISN). We call the tool being developed the SCaN Network Integration and Engineering (SCaN NI&E) Simulator. The intended uses of such a simulator are: (1) to characterize performance of particular protocols and configurations in mission planning phases; (2) to optimize system configurations by testing a larger parameter space than may be feasible in either production networks or an emulated environment; (3) to test solutions in order to find issues/risks before committing more significant resources needed to produce real hardware or flight software systems. We describe two use cases of the tool: (1) standalone simulation of CEV to ISS baseline scenario to determine network performance, (2) participation in Distributed Simulation Integration Laboratory (DSIL) tests to perform function testing and verify interface and interoperability of geographically dispersed simulations/emulations. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2009 en_US
dc.title Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) network simulation tool development and its use cases en_US
dc.type Preprint en_US


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