JPL Technical Report Server

Low-latitude ethane rain on Titan

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Dalba, Paul A.
dc.contributor.author Buratti, Bonnie J.
dc.contributor.author Brown, R. H.
dc.contributor.author Barnes, J. W.
dc.contributor.author Baines, K. H.
dc.contributor.author Sotin, C.
dc.contributor.author Clark, R. N.
dc.contributor.author Lawrence, K. J.
dc.contributor.author Nicholson, P. D.
dc.date.accessioned 2013-07-08T16:55:34Z
dc.date.available 2013-07-08T16:55:34Z
dc.date.issued 2012-08
dc.identifier.citation JPL Summer Intern Program, Pasadena, California, August 2012 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 12-4000
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/43339
dc.description.abstract Cassini ISS observed multiple widespread changes in surface brightness in Titan's equatorial regions over the past three years. These brightness variations are attributed to rainfall from cloud systems that appear to form seasonally. Determining the composition of this rainfall is an important step in understanding the “methanological” cycle on Titan. I use data from Cassini VIMS to complete a spectroscopic investigation of multiple rain-wetted areas. I compute “before-and-after” spectral ratios of any areas that show either deposition or evaporation of rain. By comparing these spectral ratios to a model of liquid ethane, I find that the rain is most likely composed of liquid ethane. The spectrum of liquid ethane contains multiple absorption features that fall within the 2-micron and 5-micron spectral windows in Titan's atmosphere. I show that these features are visible in the spectra taken of Titan's surface and that they are characteristically different than those in the spectrum of liquid methane. Furthermore, just as ISS saw the surface brightness reverting to its original state after a period of time, I show that VIMS observations of later flybys show the surface composition in different stages of returning to its initial form. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2012. en_US
dc.subject Cassini en_US
dc.subject Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) en_US
dc.title Low-latitude ethane rain on Titan en_US
dc.type Other en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search


Browse

My Account