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Impact of surface emissions to the zonal variability of tropical tropospheric ozone and carbon monoxide for november 2004

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dc.contributor.author Bowman, K. W.
dc.contributor.author Jones, D.
dc.contributor.author Logan, J.
dc.contributor.author Worden, H.
dc.contributor.author Boersma, F.
dc.contributor.author Chang, R.
dc.contributor.author Kulawik, S.
dc.contributor.author Osterman, G.
dc.contributor.author Worden, J.
dc.date.accessioned 2008-08-18T22:49:15Z
dc.date.available 2008-08-18T22:49:15Z
dc.date.issued 2008-01-29
dc.identifier.citation Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 8, 1505–1548, 2008 en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 07-3486
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/40923
dc.description.abstract The chemical and dynamical processes governing the zonal variability of tropical tropospheric ozone and carbon monoxide are investigated for November 2004 using satellite observations, in-situ measurements, and chemical transport models in conjunction with inverse-estimated surface emissions. Vertical ozone profile estimates from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and ozone sonde measurements from the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) network show the so called zonal “wave-one” pattern, which is characterized by peak ozone concentrations (70–80 ppb) centered over the Atlantic, as well as elevated concentrations of ozone over Indonesia and Australia (60–70 ppb) in the lower troposphere. Observational evidence from TES CO vertical profiles and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 columns point to regional surface emissions as an important contributor to the elevated ozone over Indonesia. This contribution is investigated with the GEOS-Chem chemistry and transport model using surface emission estimates derived from an optimal inverse model, which was constrained by TES and Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) CO profiles (Jones et al., 2007). These a posteriori estimates, which were over a factor of 2 greater than climatological emissions, reduced differences between GEOS-Chem and TES ozone observations by 30–40% and led to changes in GEOS-Chem upper tropospheric ozone of up to 40% over Indonesia. The remaining residual differences can be explained in part by upper tropospheric ozone produced from lightning NOx in the South Atlantic. Furthermore, model simulations from GEOS-Chem indicate that ozone over Indonesian/Australian is more sensitive to changes in surface emissions of NOx than ozone over the tropical Atlantic. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher EGU en_US
dc.subject tropical tropospheric ozone en_US
dc.subject Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) en_US
dc.title Impact of surface emissions to the zonal variability of tropical tropospheric ozone and carbon monoxide for november 2004 en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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