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UAVSAR : a new NASA airborne SAR system for science and technology research

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dc.contributor.author Rosen, Paul A.
dc.contributor.author Hensley, Scott
dc.contributor.author Wheeler, Kevin
dc.contributor.author Sadowy, Greg
dc.contributor.author Miller, Tim
dc.contributor.author Shaffer, Scott
dc.contributor.author Muellerschoen, Ron
dc.contributor.author Jones, Cathleen
dc.contributor.author Zebker, Howard
dc.contributor.author Madsen, Soren
dc.date.accessioned 2007-05-31T16:49:04Z
dc.date.available 2007-05-31T16:49:04Z
dc.date.issued 2006-04-24
dc.identifier.citation IEEE Radar Conference, Verona, New York, April 24-27, 2006. en
dc.identifier.clearanceno 06-0357
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/40223
dc.description.abstract NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory is currently building a reconfigurable, polarimetric L-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), specifically designed to acquire airborne repeat track SAR data for differential interferometric measurements. Differentian interferometry can provide key deformation measurements, important for studies of earthquakes, volcanoes and other dynamically changing phenomena. Using precision real-time GPS and a sensor controlled flight management system, the system will be able to fly predefined paths with great precision. The expected performance of the flight control system will constrain the flight path to be within a 10 m diameter tube about the desired flight track. The radar will be designed to be operable on a UAV (Unpiloted Aria1 Vehicle) but will initially be demonstrated on a NASA Gulfstream 111. The radar will be fully polarimetric, with a range bandwidth of 80 MHz (2 m range resolution), and will support a 16 km range swath. The antenna will be electronically steered along track to assure that the antenna beam can be directed independently, regardless of the wind direction and speed. Other features supported by the antenna include elevation monopulse and pulse-to-pulse re-steering capabilities that will enable some novel modes of operation. The system will nominally operate at 45,000 ft (13800 m). The program began as an Instrument Incubator Project (IIP) funded by NASA Earth Science and Technology Office (ESTO). en
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en
dc.format.extent 1905379 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2006. en
dc.subject electronically scanned array en
dc.subject interferometry en
dc.subject radar en
dc.subject synthetic aperture radar (SAR) en
dc.subject Unpiloted Arial Vehicle (UAV) en
dc.title UAVSAR : a new NASA airborne SAR system for science and technology research en
dc.type Preprint en


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