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Reducing costs of managing and accessing navigation and ancillary data by relying on the extensive capabilities of NASA's spice system

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dc.contributor.author Semenov, Boris V.
dc.contributor.author Acton, Charles H. Jr.
dc.contributor.author Bachman, Nathaniel J.
dc.contributor.author Elson, Lee S.
dc.contributor.author Wright, Edward D.
dc.date.accessioned 2006-06-28T18:14:48Z
dc.date.available 2006-06-28T18:14:48Z
dc.date.issued 2005-06-14
dc.identifier.citation 6th International Symposium on Reducing the Cost of Spacecraft Ground Systems and Operations, Darmstadt, Germany, June 14-17, 2005. en
dc.identifier.clearanceno 6th International Symposium on Reducing the Cost of Spacecraft Ground Systems and Operations, Darmstadt, Germany, June 14-17, 2005.
dc.identifier.clearanceno 6th International Symposium on Reducing the Cost of Spacecraft Ground Systems and Operations, Darmstadt, Germany, June 14-17, 2005.
dc.identifier.clearanceno 05-1249
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/39407
dc.description.abstract The SPICE system of navigation and ancillary data possesses a number of traits that make its use in modern space missions of all types highly cost efficient. The core of the system is a software library providing API interfaces for storing and retrieving such data as trajectories, orientations, time conversions, and instrument geometry parameters. Applications used at any stage of a mission life cycle can call SPICE APIs to access this data and compute geometric quantities required for observation planning, engineering assessment and science data analysis. SPICE is implemented in three different languages, supported on 20+ computer environments, and distributed with complete source code and documentation. It includes capabilities that are extensively tested by everyday use in many active projects and are applicable to all types of space missions - flyby, orbiters, observatories, landers and rovers. While a customer's initial SPICE adaptation for the first mission or experiment requires a modest effort, this initial effort pays off because adaptation for subsequent missions/experiments is just a small fraction of the initial investment, with the majority of tools based on SPICE requiring no or very minor changes. en
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en
dc.format.extent 2226744 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2005. en
dc.subject geometry en
dc.subject ancillary data en
dc.title Reducing costs of managing and accessing navigation and ancillary data by relying on the extensive capabilities of NASA's spice system en
dc.type Preprint en


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