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Deep Impact Autonomous Navigation : the trials of targeting the unknown

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dc.contributor.author Kubitschek, Daniel G.
dc.contributor.author Mastrodemos, Nickolaos
dc.contributor.author Werner, Robert A.
dc.contributor.author Kennedy, Brian M.
dc.contributor.author Synnott, Stephen P.
dc.contributor.author Null, George W.
dc.contributor.author Bhaskaran, Shyam
dc.contributor.author Riedel, Joseph E.
dc.contributor.author Vaughan, Andrew T.
dc.date.accessioned 2006-02-24T16:59:58Z
dc.date.available 2006-02-24T16:59:58Z
dc.date.issued 2006-02-04
dc.identifier.citation 29th Annual AAS Guidance and Control Conference, Breckenridge, Colorado, February 4-8, 2006. en
dc.identifier.clearanceno 06-0355
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/38755
dc.description.abstract On July 4, 2005 at 05:44:34.2 UTC the Impactor Spacecraft (s/c) impacted comet Tempel 1 with a relative speed of 10.3 km/s capturing high-resolution images of the surface of a cometary nucleus just seconds before impact. Meanwhile, the Flyby s/c captured the impact event using both the Medium Resolution Imager (MRI) and the High Resolution Imager (HRI) and tracked the nucleus for the entire 800 sec period between impact and shield attitude transition. The objective of the Impactor s/c was to impact in an illuminated area viewable from the Flyby s/c and capture high-resolution context images of the impact site. This was accomplished by using autonomous navigation (AutoNav) algorithms and precise attitude information from the attitude determination and control subsystem (ADCS). The Flyby s/c had two primary objectives: 1) capture the impact event with the highest temporal resolution possible in order to observe the ejecta plume expansion dynamics; and 2) track the impact site for at least 800 sec to observe the crater formation and capture the highest resolution images possible of the fully developed crater. These two objectives were met by estimating the Flyby s/c trajectory relative to Tempel 1 using the same AutoNav algorithms along with precise attitude information from ADCS and independently selecting the best impact site. This paper describes the AutoNav system, what happened during the encounter with Tempel 1 and what could have happened. en
dc.description.sponsorship NASA/JPL en
dc.format.extent 1199702 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2006. en
dc.subject Deep Impact en
dc.subject impactor spacecraft en
dc.subject comet Tempel 1 en
dc.title Deep Impact Autonomous Navigation : the trials of targeting the unknown en
dc.type Preprint en


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