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Autonomy software verification and validation might not be as hard as it seems

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dc.contributor.author Gat, Erann
dc.date.accessioned 2005-11-15T21:01:42Z
dc.date.available 2005-11-15T21:01:42Z
dc.date.issued 2004-03
dc.identifier.citation IEEE Aerospace Conference, Big Sky, MT, March 6-13, 2004 en
dc.identifier.clearanceno 03-3423
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/38126
dc.description.abstract The verification and validation of autonomy software is widely believed to be a challenging unsolved problem. To a certain extent this is true, but in this paper I argue that the problem is not nearly as severe as seems to be widely perceived. many of the perceived hard problems in autonomy software V&V also exist for traditional software, and can be solved using many of the same methods and techniques used for traditional spacecraft software. In particular, the problem of intractably large state spaces exists for any non-trivial software system. en
dc.description.sponsorship NASA en
dc.format.extent 3938595 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Pasadena, CA : Jet Propulsion Laboratory, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 2004. en
dc.subject autonomy software en
dc.subject spacecraft en
dc.title Autonomy software verification and validation might not be as hard as it seems en
dc.type Preprint en


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