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(abstract) Science-Project Interaction in the Low-Cost Mission

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dc.contributor.author Wall, Stephen D. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2004-10-06T05:34:23Z
dc.date.available 2004-10-06T05:34:23Z
dc.date.issued 1994-04-12 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Laurel, MD en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 93-1752 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/36019
dc.description.abstract Large, complex, and highly optimized missions have performed most of the preliminary reconnaisance of the solar system. As a result we have now mapped significant fractions of its total surface (or surface-equivalent) area. Now, however, scientific exploration of the solar system is undergoing a major change in scale, and existing missions find it necessary to limit costs while fulfilling existing goals. In the future, NASA's Discovery program will continue the reconnaisance, exploration, and diagnostic phases of planetary research using lower cost missions, which will include lower cost mission operations systems (MOS). Historically, one of the more expensive functions of MOS has been its interaction with the science community. Traditional MOS elements that this interaction have embraced include mission planning, science (and engineering) event conflict resolution, sequence optimization and integration, data production (e.g., assembly, enhancement, quality assurance, documentation, archive), and other science support services. In the past, the payoff from these efforts has been that use of mission resources has been highly optimized, constraining resources have been generally completely consumed, and data products have been accurate and well documented. But because these functions are expensive we are now challenged to reduce their cost while preserving the benefits. In this paper, we will consider ways of revising the traditional MOS approach that might save project resources while retaining a high degree of service to the Projects' customers. Pre-launch, science interaction can be made simplier by limiting numbers of instruments and by providing greater redundancy in mission plans. Post launch, possibilities include prioritizing data collection into a few categories, easing requirements on real-time of quick-look data delivery, and closer integration of scientists into the mission operation. en_US
dc.format.extent 6584 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject.other mission operation science community interaction cost project resources en_US
dc.title (abstract) Science-Project Interaction in the Low-Cost Mission en_US


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