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The Earth Observing System

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dc.contributor.author Kahn, R. en_US
dc.contributor.author Wenkert, D. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2004-10-06T01:37:17Z
dc.date.available 2004-10-06T01:37:17Z
dc.date.issued 1993 en_US
dc.identifier.citation The Van Nostrand Reinhold Encyclopedia of Planetary Sciences en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 93-0440 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/34975
dc.description.abstract The idea that the climate of Earth has changed is not new. Much evidence has been collected from the sedimentary record indicating periodic as well as secular changes in climate parameters such as surface temperature, precipitation amount, and ice extent and abundance, on many time scales. But in the last quarter of the twentieth century, there are several new elements in the way climate change is perceived. One is the view that human activity is having an impact on climatic conditions, on a global scale. The conclusion of recent studies indicating that anthropogenic chlorofluorocarbons are the root cause of a measured secular decrease in atmospheric ozone column abundance over the Antarctic in spring, illustrates this point (e.g., Solomon 1990). en_US
dc.format.extent 1638761 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.title The Earth Observing System en_US


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