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Autonomy Enables New Science Missions

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dc.contributor.author Doyle, R. J. en_US
dc.contributor.author Gor, V. en_US
dc.contributor.author Man, G. K. en_US
dc.contributor.author Stolorz, P. E. en_US
dc.contributor.author Chapman, C. en_US
dc.contributor.author Merline, W. J. en_US
dc.contributor.author Stern, A. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2004-09-30T23:17:44Z
dc.date.available 2004-09-30T23:17:44Z
dc.date.issued 1997-01-26 en_US
dc.identifier.citation Albuquerque, NM en_US
dc.identifier.clearanceno 96-1330 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2014/26459
dc.description.abstract The challenge of space flight in NASA's future is to enable smaller, more frequent and intensive space exploration at much lower total cost without substantially decreasing mission reliability, capability, or the scientific return on investment. The most effective way to achieve this goal is to build intelligent capabilities into the spacecraft themselves. Our technological vision for meeting the challenge of returning quality science through limited communication bandwidth will actually put scientists in a more direct link with the spacecraft than they have enjoyed to date. Ultimately, new classes of exploration missions will be enabled. en_US
dc.format.extent 1498687 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.subject.other autonomy cost pattern recognition artificial intelligence imaging UV spectra communications en_US
dc.title Autonomy Enables New Science Missions en_US


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